Sports Drinks Can Seriously Damage Your Dental Health

Sports drinks might keep you cool under pressure, but they may do more than that. They may also do a number on your teeth.

Twenty years ago, decay was running rampant. Sugar was 90% of a balanced diet. Then with the introduction of sugar-free snacks and sodas, that number was deflated, until a few years ago, when energy drinks and sports drinks hit the market.Regular consumption of popular energy drinks has now been proven to cause cavities in less than a month.

Those who enjoy sports drinks and energy drinks on occasion are still at risk of developing cavities, but the much higher risk is with those who consume them on a regular basis. Even sports drinks which claim to have very little sugar, those with their electrolyte content their point of advertising; can do a number on the teeth.

This is not only because of the sugar content, but the acid content. The acidity in the drinks is part of what makes them so flavorful. The acid often replaces the sugar in sugar-free drinks, especially in those high in electrolytes.

Sports drinks may be a problem, however, but not nearly as big a problem as energy drinks. Not only are energy drinks extremely high in both sugar and acid, but they are also extremely addicting. Some parents believe that energy drinks should only be sold to those over the age of 18. Some believe that they should be done away with altogether. Regardless, someone addicted to sports drinks or energy drinks, sugar-free or full-flavor may soon be spending more time at the dentist than at the cooler.

Dr. Steffany Mohan is the Owner of Plaza Dental Group and is a leading Dentist In Des Moines, Iowa. Dr. Mohan is an expert in implant, pediatric and cosmetic dentistry, is Invisalign certified and has gained a reputation of excellence in the dentistry community.

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